The benefits of art – Part 2

Loom
Another way art can improve mental health and well-being is by giving people a reason to come together and build a sense of community on and off-line. This can inevitably help to stimulate conversations and help people understand one another. It allows for connection, it enables people to be heard, it brings like-minded people together, it can trigger a chain reaction of kindness, build new friendships as well as continue to enhance creative skills.
I suppose what I’m really saying is that art can contribute towards a healing process on a personal and a community level. How we treat ourselves inevitably impacts us and everyone around us. Having a shared sense of purpose where we can profoundly touch one another’s lives, can be incredibly far reaching. It can:
  • it can enable people to manage many health conditions
  • reduce depression, anxiety and stress
  • bring a sense of joy and achievement
  • improve decision making skills
  • enhance problem solving skills
In light of the current pandemic, despite many of us feeling tired and broken it is groups like this, which can be the difference to mending our community, as opposed to letting the situation spiral out of control. After all, when people become dear to us because of shared moments, no matter who they are and where they are from we care enough to help one another out.

"Slow-looking"

Definition – The act of mindfully enjoying art

When it comes to art, slow-looking is the act of giving yourself the time to fully immerse yourself in a piece of art and making your own discoveries. Many people start by taking their time to unravel the different elements of the art piece and working out the story being told by the artist. Think about how the art makes you feel, take your time and don’t worry if nothing comes to mind straight away.

You don’t have to go to a gallery to practice slow-looking, you can apply the same techniques to pieces of art in your own home, looking at your favourite artists work online or even sculptures in your local town and parks. For a full guide on practising slow-looking visit the Tate Modern website. https://www.tate.org.uk/art/guide-slow-looking

Join a digital activity

Are you interested in starting a new creative hobby or meeting like-minded people who enjoy similar interests? Head over our digital activities page to find out more about our upcoming activities, don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions.

Other links

Armchair Gallery | Armchair Gallery brings world-class art & culture to you – This app is designed for individuals who are unable to get out

mymodernmet.com – mymodernmet also share on Facebook. Their articles are thought provoking and inspiring. You can even become a member!

Accessed [16/03/21] at https://www.ageuk.org.uk/bp-assets/globalassets/oxfordshire/original-blocks/about-us/age-uk-report–creative-and-cultural-activities-and-wellbeing-in-later-life-april-2018.pdf

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